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  About K&B Electric, KB Electric, KB Electric LLC, K & B Electric LLC

 


WARNING:  It can be VERY dangerous, even FATAL, when an amateur tries fixing an electrical problem with an electrical service, machine, fixture or appliance!  We strongly suggest that you don't take that risk!


At K & B ELECTRIC LLC, safety is the most important aspect of our business.  In fact, we maintain the highest safety standards in every aspect of our business.  We have a company-wide goal of zero electrical accidents and injuries on every job we conduct.  We continually reiterate electrical safety procedures, provide positive reinforcement of, both, safe behavior and safe techniques in all applications, and we will respond quickly to any unsafe acts, might they occur.

The below Q&As are offered as general safety information and are not to be considered a subsitute to an electrical safety inspection conducted by a certified electrician, licensed within your state.


Commonly Asked Safety Questions:

  1. Can I do my own electrical work?
  2. What voltage level is considered dangerous?
  3. What causes electrical shock?
  4. How can home owners & apartment dwellers help reduce the chance of electrical burns?
  5. First Aid: Electrical Shock & Burns ... CALL 9-1-1
  6. What should I be looking for when I call an Electrical Contractor or an Electrician?
  7. I want to do some landscaping/excavating on my property.  How can I tell if there are underground wires?
  8. Is the electrical system in my business, or home, safe?
  9. Do lightning surge protectors actually work?
  10. Sometimes I sense a little tingling, or minor shock, when...
  11. Why does my electrical outlet spark?
  12. Flickering or dimming lights
  13. What is an Arc Flash and is it dangerous?
  14. Electrical Fire! What should I do?
  15. Is it okay to use a dimmer with flourescent lights?
  16. What is the difference between a curcuit breaker and a fuse?
  17. How do I reset a circuit breaker?
  18. What does a GFCI devise do?
  19. What should I do if the GFCI device trips?
  20. My lights dim when I turn on my air conditioner.  Why?
Q. Can I do my own electrical work?
A. First, please check your local ordinances for regulations within your community.  Most local governments will require you to have a permit to do any electrical work.  Anyone performing the work must do it in compliance with the National Electric Code (NEC).  When you sell the building most municipalities will require an inspection letter from a licensed electrical contractor.  If you do the work without meeting the local requirements, you could be taking on the electrical no permit liability.  Amateur electrical work is very risky, often fatal.  Studies say a thousand (approx.) people die every year from electrocution.
Q. What voltage level is considered dangerous?
A. There is no absolute rule; however, any level that exceeds 30 volts is generally considered dangerous.
Q. What causes electrical shock?
A.

Electric current travels along a closed circuit by way of a conductor. Common electricity conductors include metal and water. Equally important, common insulators/materials that stop the flow of current include wood, glass, rubber, clay and plastic.

Electric shock occurs when an unintentional electricity and conductor becomes part of an electric circuit and receives electric current resulting in a shock. Electric current may come from multiple wires within an elctric circuit, through one wire in contact with an energized circuit and the ground or through an exposed metal part that has been energized with current through a break in insulation or another conductor.

Electric shock can occur when you come in contact with live current available at any electric source including outlets, exposed wires or other areas where electric current is present.

Q. How can home owners & apartment dwellers help reduce the chance of electrical burns?
A.

By following the below safety tips, you can help reduce the chance of electrical burns in your home:

  • Use child safety plugs in all outlets
  • Keep electrical cords out of children's reach
  • Avoid electrical hazards by following manufacturer's safety instructions when using electrical appliances.
  • Always turn ff circuit breakers before attempting any repairs to wiring
  • Avoid using electrical appliances while showering or when wet
  • Never touch electrical appliances while touching faucets or cold water pipes
Q. First Aid: Electrical Shock & Burns ... CALL 9-1-1
A.

Know the facts, electrical burns need to be avoided! The following links provide important information and photos:

Q. What should I be looking for when I call an Electrical Contractor or an Electrician?
A. Make sure the contractor, or the electrician, is licensed to work in your community.  You can contact your local government office to determine the proper licensing requirements.  Don't hesitate to ask the contractor or electrician to see their license, reputable companies will have no problem with that.
Q. I want to do some landscaping/excavating on my property.  How can I tell if there are underground wires?
A.

In Wisconsin, call "Digger's Hotline" at 811/242-8511 or 800/242-8511 for assistance.  If an emergency, call 877/500-9592.  For further information, visit www.diggershotline.com.  In other areas you should contact your local utility and they can mark the location of underground lines for you.

Call us, if your landscaping design includes lights--we provide professional wiring through fixture products and installation.

Q. Is the electrical system in my business, or home, safe?
A. Not sure?  You can find out how reliable and safe it is by having us conduct a professional inspection. All electrical equipment used in industrial, commercial or institutional settings should be checked regularly by a qualified professional.  Under severe conditions, the equipment should be checked as little as every 30 days.  When used in a mild environment your electrical equipment should be inspected at least once a year.  It is a good idea to keep written records of the inspections to keep track of any trends that could be showing signs of an impending failure.
Q. Do lightning surge protectors actually work?
A. Lightning is a very powerful force of nature and nothing can totally prevent it from causing damage under the right conditions. However, you stand a much better chance of protecting your valuable electrical/electronic equipment by using surge suppression for most circumstances.
Q. Sometimes I sense a little tingling, or minor shock, when...
A. Not normal, not good!  One should never get even a minor shock when touching an electrical device, or walking over underground wires.  If you do, unplug the device, or flip the circuit breaker off, immediately and consult a professional electrical contractor/electrician.  Abnormal situations could easily become fatal.  CALL today, or complete our online contact form, and we'll resolve the situation.
Q. Why does my electrical outlet spark?
A.

Never a good thing! Sparking outlets are usually caused by excessive heat within the outlet, and the protective insulation inside the outlet may be melted away; a serious electrical fire risk. When an electrical outlet sparks, buzzes, feels warm to the touch, or emits a burning smell, do not wait to see if the problem goes away on its own, because it won't! Call us for electrical repairs.

Q. Flickering or dimming lights
A. If your lights are flickering or dimming you may have one or more poor connection area in your electrical system. Inside the building walls, arcing may occur at the problem area(s); wallboards, wood framing and other combustible materials can catch fire. It's time for an electrical inspection!
Q. What is an Arc Flash and is it dangerous?
A. House fires are not always started by sputtering grease or overturned candles, electrical wires can also start a fire in homes and work places--when arcing occurs. Arcing occurs where there is a break in an electrical circuit, causing the current to jump across the gap, producing sparks and high heat. If the sparks touch combustible materials a fire is started.
Q. Electrical Fire! What should I do?
A.

First, always call the fire department (be sure to tell them it's an electrical fire so they can be prepared). Even if it appears to be a small fire, it's better to have them on their way.

With dry hands, shut off the main breakers to the house, if possible. If a fire is in or near the breaker box, do not attempt this.

Use a class-C or multi-purpose ABC fire extingquisher to put out the flames. As the cause of fires are different, so are the most effective solutions. Do NOT use any other types of extinguishers on an electrical fire. (If the proper extinguisher is unavailable, throw baking soda (a sodium bicarbonate) on the fire to smother it.

Get out of the house and wait for help to arrive. After the fire department has done their job, and the home is still salvagable, hire a well trusted certified electrician to professionaly investigate, repair the electrical system, and handle the electrical wiring of any remodeling projects. A repeat of electrical fires can be avoided with preventive measures.

Q. Is it okay to use a dimmer with flourescent lights?
A. Yes, but you must use a dimmer and light fixture specially made for fluorescent lights.
Q. What is the difference between a curcuit breaker and a fuse?
A. A circuit breaker and a fuse both perform the same function, interrupting the flow of electricity when a fault is sensed in an electric circuit.  Fuses are cheaper to install, but not as efficient in the long run.  Circuit breakers can be reset without having to replace anything, but fuses must be replaced when they trip.  Today circuit breakers are economical and are used in most modern applications due to their ease of use.
Q. How do I reset a circuit breaker?
A. First you need to determine why the circuit breaker tripped.  The breaker is there for a reason, to protect you and your belongings. Also important, homes have several electrical circuits that run throughout the building(s). These circuits all tie into the main service panel.

Once you have unplugged whatever caused the problem, you can proceed to the circuit breaker box.  Open the door to the circuit breaker box to see the row(s) of breakers. Never remove the cover from the circuit breaker box since this will expose dangerous levels of electricity.

You can normally tell which circuit breaker has tripped just by looking at it. Circuit breakers look and act similar to a regular wall switch that you use to turn on the lights, but most of the time they are oriented horizontally instead of vertically.  The tripped circuit breaker will appear to be in the middle position, neither on or off. Push it all the way to the off position, then switch it back to the on position where it should latch. If it doesn't latch try repeating the sequence.

As always when you are dealing with electricity use extreme caution and if it doesn't look right then don't do it.  If the breaker will not latch or it trips again, do not continue trying to reset it.  CALL today, or complete our online contact form, so we can check and repair your electrical system.

Q. What does a GFCI devise do?
A. A GFCI device is a Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter. It is a device designed to protect you from electrical shock.  Many times you will find them in areas with wet surfaces such as a bathroom, kitchen or garage, or used in outdoor electrical outlets. If the device senses a ground fault it will trip to prevent the possibility of electric shock or electrocution.
Q. What should I do if the GFCI device trips?
A. There are two buttons on GFCI devices. You can test the device by pressing the black button.  That should cause the circuit to trip, indicated by the red button popping out.  When this happens, the outlet will be disabled and all other outlets and electrical connections on that circuit will be disabled.  To reset the device, press the red button until it latches in place.  If the device tripped by itself, check for causes that might have made it trip before trying to reset it.  If it continues to trip for no apparent reason, give us a CALL or complete our online contact form.  We'll check it out.
Q. My lights dim when I turn on my air conditioner.  Why?
A. An air conditioner presents a very large load to your electrical circuit and can cause a momentary dip in the voltage level.  This momentary dip is what causes the lights to dim, but it has no ill effect on your electrical circuits or electrical devices.
 
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Take Good Care!

Most tools in a construction site are powered by electricity, and those power cables attached to those power tools can get stripped or damaged during any one of the construction phases.

Electrical cables that come in contact with fluid can instantly electrocute people within the vicinity, causing a serious or fatal injury. Danger, warning, and caution signs are imperative and not to be taken lightly!

 

Safety Protects People - Quality Protects Jobs

Danger High Voltage Keep Out

Electrical Panel Keep Clear

Caution Electrical Hazard

Danger High Voltage

 


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Our promise to you, our clients and customers - Integrity Timeliness Quality K & B ELECTRIC LLC
Licensed, Bonded & Insured
Green Bay, Wisconsin  54313
(Village of Suamico)
(920) 655-3676
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